Studio Clay: Grades K – 3

Holidays: Art and Religion

image001Angel Wall Plaque: A charming angel holds a candle to spread a message of love. It’s the most popular workshop of the year! Curriculum Links: Religion, Social Studies, Art

 

 

image003Easter Cross: Students design an Easter Cross on a slab of clay with draped cloth and Easter lilies. This project is a wonderful keepsake for any child’s bedroom. Curriculum Links: Religion, Social Studies, Art

 

image005Glowing Pumpkins: Students design an expressive pumpkin face. The piece is created on a flat surface and then attached to a base. Curriculum Links: Science, Art

 

 

image007Madonna and Child: This project provides a simple approach for young students to celebrate the birth of Christ, portraying Mary and child. Curriculum Links: Religion, Social Studies, Art

 

 

image009Manger and Star: This nativity plaque depicts baby Jesus in a manger of straw. A guiding star shines down on the manger scene. Curriculum Links: Religion, Social Studies, Art

 

 

image011O Christmas Tree: Working with a slab of clay, students create a festive Christmas tree. Branches are textured and decorated with ornaments. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art


Cultural: Art and Social Studies

image013Alberta Rose and Pines: This is a popular workshop that celebrates Alberta. Students cut a slab of clay into the shape of the province and design a wild rose and lodge pole pines, symbols of Alberta. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art

 

image015Friends Forever: Celebrate friendship with this charming clay relief plaque depicting two friends. It makes a special keepsake or gift. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art

 

 

image017I’m Unique (Kindergarten): Children create a figure of themselves on a slab of clay and a treasured gift for a parent or special person. Curriculum Links: Citizenship and Identity, Creative Expression

 

 

image019Inuit Inspired Plaque: Students create a two-dimensional Inuit inspired figure, complete with traditional clothing. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art • Complements The Inuit program at the Museum

 

image021Inuksuk: An inuksuk (ee-nook-sook) is a stone landmark that guides travelers. Traditionally, Inuit people in the Arctic built them where the landscape had few distinguishing features. Students shape clay to build a standing structure. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art • Complements The Inuit program at the Museum

Mom and Me or Dad and Me (Grade 1+): Students make themselves and another figure on a plaque. Choose Mom and Me, Dad and Me or My Grownup and Me. Let the registration office know ahead of time. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art

image023Nunavut Kayak: Students create a three-dimensional Inuit inspired figure, complete with traditional clothing. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art • Complements The Inuit program at the Museum


Favorites: Art and Science

image025Bird’s Nest (Grade 1+): A favourite with young children! These pottery nests are complete with a mother bird on a branch and eggs in a nest. Curriculum Links: Science, Art

 

 

image027Brilliant Butterfly: Using coils and pressed shapes on a slab of clay, students create their version of a beautiful, brilliant butterfly.. Curriculum Links: Science, Art

 

 

image029Frogs and Toads: Students make a frog on a lily pad. As an alternative, make a special request for a lizard or salamander project. Curriculum Links: Science, Art

 

 

image031Ladybug: This large ladybug will have texture and color when students finish it later. Chenille stems for the legs and antennae are provided. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Science, Art

 

 

image033Metamorphosis: Using coils and pressed shapes on a long slab of clay, students show the stages of development from caterpillar, to cocoon, to butterfly. Curriculum Links: Science, Art

 

 

image035Owl (Grade 2+): Did you know there are close to 40 different species of owl in North America and the Great Horned Owl has been chosen as Alberta’s provincial bird? Students learn to sculpt one specific owl species. Curriculum Links: Science, Art

 

 

image037Tyrannosaurus Rex: This carnivore once roamed the earth in search of fresh meat to eat. Students love to create this fierce giant in clay! Curriculum Links: Science, Art

 

 

image039Stegasaurus: This gentle herbivore lived in the late Jurassic period. It had a long tail with a double row of plates along its back for protection. Curriculum Links: Science, Art

 

 

image041Under the Sea: Using a variety of hand-building techniques, students create a plaque depicting life under the ocean’s waves. Curriculum Links: Science, Art


Creative Expression: Art

image043Elfin Tooth Fairy: An enchanting winged fairy, mounted on a tooth-shaped plaque, holds out cupped hands to carefully protect little lost teeth.Curriculum Links: Art

 

 

IMG_0380Father’s Day Trophy: This is the perfect clay project for Father’s Day!  Students learn to cut a slab into a trophy shape, roll coils for decorative handles and use different clay tools to decorate it especially for dad.

 

 


Studio Clay: Grades 3 – 5

Holidays: Art and Religion

image047Ho Ho Ho: Saint Nicholas, Father Christmas, Père Noël, Kris Kringle, Santa Claus – a celebrated figure who gives presents to children and the poor. Students learn about sculpting facial features. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Language Arts, Art

 

 

image049Manger Scene (Grade 4+): Students create a detailed 3D nativity scene that stands on its own. It’s a keepsake for years to come. Curriculum Links: Religion, Social Studies, Art

 

 

image051Standing Angel: If students have made the Angel Wall Plaque, they will enjoy this standing sculpture, complete with wings and halo. This angel also clasps a small wax candle to light up the Christmas season. Curriculum Links: Religion, Social Studies, Art


Cultural: Art and Social Studies

image053Alberta Flag (Grades 3+): The Alberta provincial flag depicts the provincial shield with St. George’s Cross, blue sky, snow-capped mountains, green hills, prairie fields, and wheat sheaves. Students design the shield on a slab of clay that resembles a flag waving in the wind. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art

 

image055Elephant World: Elephants are fascinating animals and have played an important role in many Asian cultures, especially India. Students create a side view of their elephant using a high relief method. Teachers may specify Asian or African elephants. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Science, Art

 

image057Grain Elevator Scene: Built in 1906 and 1929, two elevators still stand side-by-side at the St. Albert Grain Elevator Park. Students capture the iconic grain elevators in a three-dimensional project, including a train for transporting grain. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art

 

image059Masks and Peru: Students create a mask inspired by ancient cultures of Peru. The instructor will recommend paint finishing techniques at the workshop. Curriculum Links: Social Studies; Art *Complements the Peru and The Aboriginal People of Canada program at the Museum.

 

image061Northwest Coastal Inspired Mask: First Nations bands along the northwest coast of Canada, such as the Kwakiutl, used highly stylized designs to fashion traditional ceremonial masks. Contemporary masks also can be found today. Students create masks that incorporate animal, human and supernatural traits, using bold, flowing lines and ovoid shapes. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Science, Art

 

image063Storytellers: This workshop is based on contemporary and traditional clay figurines made by potters in New Mexico and parts of South America, such as Peru. It emphasizes the importance of the storyteller, the listener, oral traditions and telling your own story. Curriculum Links: Language Arts, Social Studies, Art

 

image065Tipi Scene: Using a range of hand building techniques, shapes and details, students make a three dimensional scene. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art *Complements the Tipi As Home program at the Museum.

 

 

image067Tunisian Doors: Tunisia is well known for its beautifully decorated doors. Wooden doors are adorned with nail head designs and symbols meant to represent the owner’s beliefs.  Doors are most often painted a vivid blue to represent blue sky and good fortune. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art *Complements St. Albert and Tunisia Program at the Museum.


Favorites: Art and Science

image069Animal Pencil Holder: A whimsical animal decorates the front of this pencil holder and the tail curls around the back. As an alternative, you may also choose a different animal when registering. Curriculum Links: Science, Art

 

 

image071Owl: Alberta’s provincial bird is the Great Horned Owl. It was voted the official bird by the province’s school children in 1977. This resourceful and resilient bird exemplifies the best traits of Alberta’s people, both past and present. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Science, Art


Creative Expression: Art

image073Parent Plaque (Grade 3): This delightful wall plaque shows a student along with their parents as a low relief sculpture. For Grade 5+, you may request a family plaque, where students make their entire family, including pets. Let the registration office know ahead of time. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art

 

image075Rose for Mom: This beautiful rose will never fade! Students learn to fashion a rose with lovely petals, a bud and some leaves resting on a circular base. It’s the perfect Mother’s Day gift. Curriculum Links: Science, Art

 

 

photo 3Cupcake Keepsake: Students will love this delicious looking clay cupcake!  Using basic clay building techniques such as pinch pot   and coil, students’ create a unique container for holding valuable little treasures.

 


Studio Clay: Grades 6+

Holidays: Art and Religion

image077Christmas Tree Tea Light: In this advanced workshop, students learn to roll, attach and join coils to build a hollow form. Their Christmas tree can then be embellished with all the trimmings, including decorative holes for light to shine through once a tea light has been placed inside. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art

 

image079Nativity Figures: A challenging project for older students. Create standing clay figures to celebrate the Christmas season. Curriculum Links: Religion, Social Studies, Art

 

 

image081Standing Angel or Figure: As well as the angel for Grade 4 and 5 listed above, older students can make a larger standing angel with more texture and decorative features. It’s a wonderful piece they can display each season. Curriculum Links: Religion, Social Studies, Art


Cultural: Art and Social Studies

image083Greek Frieze: Using high relief techniques on a slab of clay, students can choose to make an urn on a plaque or Greek frieze imagery. A variety of designs are provided. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art

 

 

image085Storytellers: This workshop is based on contemporary and traditional clay figurines made by potters in New Mexico and parts of South America, such as Peru. It emphasizes the importance of the storyteller, the listener, oral traditions and telling your own story. High school Spanish and art classes have enjoyed this program. Curriculum Links: Language Arts, Social Studies, Art

 

image087Turtle Shell Rattle: In the Iroquois tradition, the turtle is a symbol of creation and life. Rattles were made from snapping turtle shells and used in healing ceremonies. Students make a rattle shaped like a turtle shell with a turtle shaped head and neck for handle. This project really rattles after firing! Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art


Favorites: Art and Science

image089Ocarina (Clay Whistle): The Ocarina is a traditional Mesoamerican flute traditionally made from clay or ceramic. “Ocarina” is a term used by Mayan and Aztec cultures of South America but many other societies developed similar wind instruments for music and ceremony. Students will use a variety of clay building techniques to create their own traditional ocarina or clay whistle. Previous clay experience is recommended for this unique and challenging clay project. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Science, Art


Creative Expression: Art

image091Animal Pencil Holder: A whimsical animal decorates the front of this pencil holder and the tail curls around the back. As an alternative, you may also choose a different animal when registering. Curriculum Links: Science, Art

 

 

image093Lucky Dragon: This magnificent dragon’s head holds a special pearl in its mouth. According to Chinese legend, anyone who is brave enough to rub this pearl is sure to have good luck. Make this lucky dragon to celebrate the Chinese New Year or just for a little good luck. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art

 

image095Family Plaque: This magnificent dragon’s head holds a special pearl in its mouth. According to Chinese legend, anyone who is brave enough to rub this pearl is sure to have good luck. Make this lucky dragon to celebrate the Chinese New Year or just for a little good luck. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art


Studio Multimedia

image097Christmas Around the World (Grades K – 4): Each student completes three art projects and learns about stories and traditions celebrated in other countries: the Story of Tinsel from the Ukraine, the Poinsettia from Mexico and the Pomander from England and the United States. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art

 

image099Lap Loom Weaving (Grades 1+): In ancient times, many households kept sheep, goats or camels and used their hair or wool to make clothing.  Lap Looms are small portable weaving tools used to speed up the process of moving one thread up and down through another thread to create a piece of woven fabric.  The process of weaving helps to promote basic math concepts, fine motor control, dexterity, concentration, self-confidence and a sense of accomplishment. Students will gain a basic understanding of how wool is carded, spun into threads and then woven on a small loom.  Students will leave this workshop with a decorative fibre art wall hanging or coaster.  A great gift idea for Mother’s Day, Father’s Day or Christmas! Curriculum Links: Science, Math, Art

 

image101Tunisian Mosaics (Grades 2+): Tunisia is home to one of the largest collections of mosaic art in the world.  The Roman Empire spread this ancient art throughout its African settlements in the early centuries of the common era. Between the second and sixth centuries, intricate patterns, ornamental designs and complex imagery turned practical floor coverings into works of art. Students will design their own Tunisian inspired mosaic by gluing tiny coloured glass tiles onto a 4″ x 4″ tile. Curriculum Links: Science, Math, Art *Complements St. Albert and Tunisia Program at the Museum.

 

image103Huichol Yarn Painting (Grades 3+): The Huichol (Whet-chol) people of northwest Mexico have an oral tradition and document their wisdom through their artwork made of wood, beeswax and yarn. Students will use bright, contrasting colours of yarn to express meaning through traditional symbols such as people, animals and nature. Symmetry, balance and geometric designs will be explored. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Science, Art

 

image105Worry Dolls (Grades 3+): These small colorful dolls are traditionally made in South American cultures such as Peru and Guatemala. According to legend, if you tell your worries to a doll before going to bed at night and put it under your pillow, you will wake up the next morning and your worries will be gone. Students learn to make their very own worry doll with colorful wire and embroidery thread. They then decorate a small wooden box in which to keep their doll safe. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Science, Art

 

image107Window Clings (Grades 4+): Create jewel-like designs that look like stained glass. Using their own drawings, students use synthetic leading to make an outline on a thick piece of plastic and coloured glass stains to fill in areas. After drying, the window clings can be peeled off the plastic and will adhere to glass surfaces. Studio space is limited but workshops are available in Outreach. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Science, Art

 

image109Needle Felted Owl (Grades 5+): Felting is one of the oldest fiber arts crafts dating back to 6300 BC. It predates spinning, weaving and knitting. Needle felting is now a popular fiber arts craft allowing students to use a special barbed needle as a sculpting tool. Barbs catch the scales in a bundle of wool and bind them together forming a 3D sculpture of an owl. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Science, Art


Art Explorers

Harmonious Hues (In conjunction with Verve exhibition)      August 6 – September 26, 2015

Patricia Coulter and Donna Marchyshyn-Shymko join forces to present Verve. This evocative exhibition showcases large-scale, fluid acrylic works that communicate energy and enthusiasm using a language of colour and shape. Art Explorers will experience works by two very exciting abstract painters. Bold, vivid hues dominate Coulter’s vibrant canvases that employ layers of poured fluid acrylic paint on canvas. The paths and patterns the paint medium creates, results in flowing movement, reminiscent of natural elements such as water, wind and nature. Art Explorers will enjoy contemplating the colours and movement of the paint.

Conversely students will actively engage with Marchyshyn-Shymko’s colourful intricate paintings that will make their eyes search for hidden and unexpected images in the non-objective marks and lines. These paintings demand close investigation and are imaginative journeys of colour and line that are reflective of abstracted landscapes.

After viewing Verve and having a lively discussion about the artists and works, students will learn about colour theory and create an intricate and harmonious line drawing, full of colour and shapes. Curriculum Links: Art, Science, and Language Arts

 

Wintery Impressions (In conjunction with The Winter that Was exhibition)      October 1 – 31, 2015

Art Explorers will be amazed by the expressive mixed media artwork from still life and landscape artist, Pierre Bataillard. This artist creates work full-time in his serene and secluded studio on his acreage property in Bonnyville. He has an abundance of nature just outside his window, which inspires him to draw and paint. The Winter that Was, features work from Bataillard’s new series that focuses on the Albertan winter. Art Explorers will see the abstract and linear works that are composed of energetic marks from pastels and pencils. The work created display a stark view of the cold, snow covered winter season. Bataillard uses a limited palette and leaves the paper sparse with only minimal expressive lines that create dramatic compositions.

Art Explorers will gain a strong understanding of abstraction, line and drawing techniques from this impressive exhibition. During a hands-on activity students will get to draw their own view of what winter means to them using charcoal and pastels. Curriculum Links: Art and Science

 

Extraordinary Objects (In conjunction with Posed and Poised exhibition)      November 5 – 28, 2015

Art Explorers will be asked to examine and contemplate everyday objects during their tour of the exhibition, Posed and Poised. A twist on still life tradition is evident featuring photography by Andrzej Maciejewski and ceramics by Juliana Rempel. Both artists have been inspired by what are usually considered ordinary objects. Juliana Rempel has created large-scale ceramic sculptures representing household objects. She is interested in the relationship between objects and their inhabited spaces. Juliana has altered the usual relationship people have with typical household objects by enlarging them and re-introducing them in a new context.

Striking still-life colour photographs by photographer, Andrzej Maciejewski bring to mind the paintings of the Old Masters. In a contemporary twist, the fruits and vegetables, carefully lit and posed in these atmospheric images come straight from the local supermarket. They still bear their label stickers with PLU numbers, shrink wrap and tags; each piece of produce perfectly formed, sized and at its peak ripeness, urging consumption. Through humorous, yet intelligent cynicism, Maciejewski inspires a discussion regarding our relationship with nature and the detriment caused by mass production and genetic modification.

Art Explorers will learn about the still life genre and will create three-dimensional still life drawing cutouts, with influence from the contemporary artwork on display. Curriculum Links: Art, Health and Social Studies

 

 


Early Arts Outreach

Preschool to Kindergarten

DSC06349My Shapes and Sizes Book: Children learn how shapes can be used to form people, places and things.  They create their own special felt book with felt shapes and tell a story about it.  The concepts of shape, form space and size will be introduced. Curriculum Links: Art, Math, Science, Fine and Gross Motor Skills

DSCN1766My Masterpieces: Children explore colour, shape and texture with paint, collage and a variety of fun techniques.  Inspired by the works of celebrated artists, they create their own great masterpieces.  The number of activities will depend on the children’s age and class size. Curriculum Links: Art, Math, Science, Fine and Gross Motor Skills

DSCN1768Rainbow Fish and Very Hungry Caterpillar: Based on these familiar books, children explore collage techniques to create colourful fish, very hungry caterpillars and beautiful butterflies.  Reading of the stories and number of activities will depend on the children’s age and class size.  Required: A parent volunteer or teacher who will cut out the butterfly wings and attach body when dry. Curriculum Links: Art, Math, Science, Fine and Gross Motor Skills

DSCN1773Very Messy Art: Children explore different mediums and create three works of art: a watercolour painting on artist-grade paper, an acrylic painting and a pinch pot using air-dry clay.  Students work in groups of four or more to share supplies. Curriculum Links: Art, Math, Science, Fine and Gross Motor Skills

 

DSCN1781Marvelous Monoprints: This workshop is a great way to introduce children to printmaking techniques.  They explore line, pattern, texture and colour and make one-of-a-kind prints on paper with tempera paints.  Required: paint shirts, large table covered with kraft paper for printing station, desks covered with paper, access to water and plenty of drying space. Curriculum Links: Art, Math, Science, Fine and Gross Motor Skills


Outreach: Grades 1 – 3

DSCN1778Basic Batik: Batik is a type of fibre art using wax and dyes or paint.  Wax is applied to fabric in a simple design. The wax serves as a resist, preventing the paint from reaching the fabric where it is applied.  This technique can be applied in layers with different colours.  Students learn the basics of colour theory by creating their own colour wheel on paper before creating a wax resist image on cotton fabric. Curriculum Links: Art and Science, Fine and Gross Motor Skills

DSCN1781Marvelous Monoprints: This workshop is a great way to introduce children to printmaking techniques.  They explore line, pattern, texture and colour to make one-of-a-kind prints.  Monoprints are made by adding tempera paint onto metal sheets and then transferring the paint onto coloured paper.  Required: A large table for printing station, desks in groups of four, access to water and plenty of drying space. Curriculum Links: Art and Science, Fine and Gross Motor Skills

DSCN1815Very Messy Art Making: Children explore different mediums and create three works of art: a watercolour painting on artist grade paper, an acrylic painting and a pinch pot using air-dry clay.  Students work in groups of four or more to share supplies.  Don’t forget to cover desks and tables and dress for a mess! Curriculum Links: Art and Science, Fine and Gross Motor Skills


Grades 2 +

DSCN1804Inuit Inspired Printmaking: Inuit printmaking began with the people of Nunavut, then known as Kinngait, about 55 years ago.  Walrus tusks or rocks were carved and then inked and printed onto paper.  Students use scratch-foam to create prints inspired by Inuit images.  Required: A large table covered with kraft paper for printing station, desks covered with paper, access to water and plenty of drying space. Curriculum Links: Art, Social Studies and Science

image021Inuksuk: An Inuksuk is a structure to mark or guide the way of travelers in the North.  This program looks at the traditional life and art of the Inuit people.  Students create their own structure using air dry clay or H435 clay if a kiln is available in your school. Curriculum Links: Art, Social Studies and Science

 

DSC05351Self Portraits: Students explore self-portraits by looking at examples of artists such as Marc Chagall, Leonardo da Vinci and Frida Kahlo.  Students explore aspects of self-identity and create their own self-portrait using pens and watercolour crayons. Curriculum Links: Art

 

Wonderful WatercoloursWonderful Watercolours: Students learn the basics of working with colour through watercolour paints.  The instructor will lead students through a series of techniques to create colourful paintings of animals, plants or landscapes.  Please choose a theme and indicate when booking. Curriculum Links: Art and Science


Grades 3 +

DSCN1789Decorative Easter Eggs: Traditionally made during the time of Easter, the colourful and intricate art of pysanka uses patterns, colours and symbols to celebrate spring.  Pysanka is derived from the Ukrainian word pysaty, meaning to write.  Designs are drawn on an egg with melted beeswax using an instrument known as a kystka before the egg is dyed a number of times using traditional colours. Required: A large covered table for egg dye station, an oven in the school and a parent to remove the wax after the workshop. Curriculum Links: Art, Math, Science and Social Studies

image059Masks and Peru: Students explore connections between cultures by looking at the significance of mask making.  They create a mask design inspired by ancient Peruvian.  Choose air dry clay or H435 if your school has a kiln and someone to fire projects. Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Art

 

Oil Pastel PicturesOil Pastel Pictures: Oil pastel is a unique media that can be used to express a wide range of moods.  Traditional images can include landscapes, seascapes and plants.  Students learn the basics of working with these smooth, rich crayons that put thick, intense colour onto paper.  Please choose a specific classroom theme and indicate at registration. Curriculum Links: Art


Grades 4 +

DSC05485Pen and Wash: Pen and Wash is a classic technique used with both pen and watercolour.  The combination of finely drawn lines and delicate watercolour washes evokes great visual beauty, whatever the chosen subject.  A workshop with great results! Curriculum Links: Social Studies, Science, Art

 

DSCN1784Nature on Canvas: Nature scenes offer excellent opportunities to introduce detail and texture into artwork.  Students may choose specific animals where the focus is on fur, skin and feathers or they may choose to explore plants, trees, forests or landscapes.  Using liquid acrylic and pens on canvas, students create spectacular nature images with great detail. Curriculum Links: Science and Art

DSC05489Mixed-Media Watercolour: Using a combination of wax, watercolour and salt, students create a winter forest scene, underwater scene or flowers in a vase.  This mixed-media workshop uses both drawing and painting on watercolour paper.  Makes a unique gift! Curriculum Links: Science and Art

 

IMG_0961Needle Felted Alberta Landscape: Needle felting is a different process where wool fibers are locked together using a special felting needle. Felting needles have angled barbs along their length that grab and bind fibers together.  Students will learn the basic theory of two-dimensional needle felting. This new knowledge will be used to explore the nature of wool and binding wool fibers together in new and creative ways. Curriculum Links: Social Studies and Art


Grades 5+

DSCN1792Abstract Art: With abstract painting, students move away from formal representation.  In this exciting workshop, students look at abstract art from its beginnings in the 20th century.  They experiment with colour and different applications of paint on art paper.  Wear art-proof clothing! Curriculum Links: Art

 

DSCN1806Linoleum Printing: A fantastic printmaking workshop!  Using professional linoleum cutting tools, students carve their own designs into Safety-Kut blocks.  These lino blocks are then inked and transferred onto specialty rag paper.  Students are shown techniques for printing without a press to create some stunning imagery.  Required:  Two large tables covered with kraft paper for printing stations, desks covered with paper, access to water and plenty of drying space.  Templates and information will be sent one month before the workshop so students can complete a drawing ahead of time. Curriculum Links: Art

 


Fees for Programs

Program Type: Fee per Student*
Studio/Outreach** $8.25
Gallery (Art Explorers) $4.50
Museum/Heritage Site $4.50

If a teachers books more then one program in a day, they will receive a $0.25 discount per program booked.

*Please note that there is a minimum fee of $132 (16 students) for Studio/Outreach programs and $60 (14 students for Gallery and Museum/Heritage Site programs).

**A additional travel fee per day is associated with all Outreach programs ($60 for Edmonton locations and $90 for all location outside the Edmonton district).